One of the more contentious issues that left a bitter episode in the Philippine-American relation has been the Balangiga Massacre. On the morning of September 28, 1901, Valeriano Abenador and Eugenio Daza led the attack against the¬†Company C of the 9th U.S. Infantry Regiment. On August 11, 1901, Company C arrived in Balangiga, a town on the south side of Samar Island. For the first several weeks, the relationship between the American soldiers and the townsfolk of Balangiga was cordial. But a series of events occurred leading to the armed uprising spearheaded by Abenador and Daza. When the smoke was cleared, 36 killed, 22 wounded,Read More →

After the proclamation of the Philippine independence from the Spanish colonial government on June 12, 1898 in Kawit, Cavite, the newly freed nation was living on a dangerous ground. With its former colonizers nearly at the end of its stranglehold of the archipelago, a new imperialistic master was preparing to take over. The Malolos Congress ratified the Malolos Constitution on January 20, 1899 in Malolos, Bulacan; approved by¬†General Emilio Aguinaldo on January 21; promulgated on January 22. On January 23, 1899, the First Philippine Republic was formally birthed with General Aguinaldo as the president. The young republic however was soon dragged into a war againstRead More →